Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
KPIX (CBS) 41
KBCW (CW) 14
KGO (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 56
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
. but there is dna-like technology that can catch a medal thief red-handed. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook shows us how it works and asks the question, why isn't anyone using it here? >> reporter: brazen thieves crashed a truck through a fence to get to a spool of copper wire in this pg&e yard. >> we had almost 5.2 million in copper theft over the last six years. >> reporter: in vallejo, criminals strip wiring from the electrical grid. >> over the last 18 months, we've had over 97 different locations where thieves have taken the electrical cables that power our street lights. >> reporter: that's on top of 300 places where they've stolen brass components from the water system. and across the bay area, they take metal from cemeteries, storm drains and automobiles. it's a problem not foreign to europe either, where thieves have hit hard at infrastructure. but the germans and others have found the answer to a huge problem may be a tiny dot. >> we call it the least expensive, most effective anti- theft device ever created. >> reporter: an australian- based company paints microdots on metal. you magnify
reporter elizabeth cook walks us to the precipice and looks over the edge. liz? >> reporter: in reality, the fiscal cliff is a deadline for congress and the president to reach a deal on the bush-era tax cuts. if you think this is something that just affects folks in washington, think again. the average household could pay an extra 2- to 3,000 in taxes. 1200 programs could be cut and it could increase the unemployment rate from 7.9 to 9%. for others, it could actually be worse. take a single mother with two kids making $50,000 a year. if we go over the fiscal cliff, she'll pay an extra $1,000 for an increase in social security taxes. and more than $1,000 because the bush-era income tax cuts are set to expire, meaning an extra $3,000 out of her paycheck next year. today, vice president biden predicted the two sides will come up with a solution. >> we're not going over the cliff. we're determined not to go over the cliff. >> reporter: it's not just the bush-era tax cuts. going over the cliff would also trigger massive federal spending cuts. that combination could push us back into another
kelley. like i said it is getting more complicated. cbs reporter elizabeth cook sorts it out. >> day of revelations. -letters start with the -- let's start with the woman who cia director david petraeus was having an affair. the fbi removed evidence from her home. agents have been looking at e- mails at he sent to jill kelley. those e-mails don't look like a threat to national security they seem to be snarky messages with a jealous message. >> reporter: jill kelley has done fundraising for the military. paula broadwell saw her as a romantic rival. paula broadwell sent jill kelley anonymous e-mails from a secret account that her and david petraeus shared. when the fbi started poking around, agents thought someone breached david petraeus' private e-mail account but it turned out they stumbled on a secret communication system they used to communicate. some of the messages sexually explicit. david petraeus would write an e- mail, he wouldn't send it, saved it to his draft folder. paula broadwell would log on and read the e-mail, that way there was never any record of messages being sent.
, was clearly irritated. cbs 5's elizabeth cook on the question, the answer, and the bigger picture. liz? >> reporter: well, dana, pelosi says she's staying on because there is still work to do. but then the temperature of the room changed, all because of a question that inferred it was time for the congresswoman to let younger folks have a chance. emily post taught us to never question or ask a woman about her age. apparently, this reporter didn't read her book. >> you're over 70. doesn't that prohibit younger leadership from moving forward? >> so you're suggesting that everybody step aside? >> i'm just saying, doesn't that delay younger leadership from moving forward? >> let's for a moment honor it as a legitimate question, although it's quite offensive, but you don't realize that, i guess. the fact is -- the fact is that everything that i have done in my -- i guess decade now of leadership is to elect younger and newer people to the congress. >> i think it's offensive, because it's often tailored toward women and there's a lot of male senators. >> reporter: she was just elected to the
in the waters of the old quarry in oakland. that's where elizabeth cook is right now. >> reporter: they are now calling this a recovery effort. if you look behind me the dive team as you see getting ready to search the 40-foot deep water in the quarry for a man that went missing earlier tonight while looking for his cat. >> this was the scene a couple hours ago as a chp helicopter swooped in to light the area where the man is believed to have fallen. as water rescue teams poke and prod the water below. firefighters scale the hillside and rugged terrain. authorities say the mans friend or roommate went outlooking for him after he didn't come back looking for his cat behind their home. he found a flashlight 15 feet down the hillside but no sign of the man. later the rescue team was able to find the cat. >> i spoke with battalion chief he says they searched every nook and cranny and they found nothing. they're planning to search until they find the missing man. elizabeth cook, cbs 5. >>> you see the rain behind elizabeth. we got this in by a photographer. he stuck a camera on his news van while dr
sides are respecting the cease-fire, for now. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook explains what happens next. >> reporter: the cease-fire means israel will stop targeted assassinations of militant leaders and palestinians in gaza will stop rocket attacks. many fear this cease fear is only a band-aid on a deep wound. after 20 hours of negotiations in egypt, secretary of state hillary clinton called the cease-fire the first step in a long process. >> now we have to focus on reaching a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security, dignity and legitimate aspirations of palestinians and israelis alike. >> reporter: hamas leader responded. after 24 hours, meeting tomorrow at 9 p.m. local cairo time, we'll begin to explore how to carry out the demands of the palestinian people, so that, god willing, the killing and aggression over gaza ends. >> if the missiles stop, it will be over, we hope. >> reporter: he remains cautiously optimistic about how long the cease-fire will actually last. hamas still has rockets and missiles. >> if they still have them, they might choose
. elizabeth cook with more on the crash. >> loved ones say they were driving back pr a quick trip to tahoe. quality time for the oklahoma family of four to enjoy the snow, but it ended like this. >> maybe one month we adopt see each other so we have thanksgiving. >> this is the sister of the driver of testify toy yoet that that chp says crossed the center line of traffic and broadsided a minivan. she celebrated the holiday with the family just two days earlier. the only survivor in the car, a ten-year old. >> i will take care of her, everything. my daughter will help me too and my sister. everybody will help each other like that. >> a little girl in the minivan, a four year old was also killed in the crash. four others in the van were hurt. >> now the chp is looking into what led to this deadly crash but krorth this year's thanksgiving data, the number of people who die died on local roadways is up from last year. 44 this year while dui arrests are down. elizabeth cook, cbs five. >> the coast guard has called off the sej for a 16-year old boy who was swept into the ocean along with h
. high level of carbon monoxide can show up in blood tests of smokers. >>> cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook on this crash and the toll it took on one bay area family. >> reporter: they were driving back from a quick trip in tahoe. but it ended like this. >> maybe one month we don't see each other. so we have a thing for thanksgiving. >> she's the sister of the driver of the toyota prius that crossed the center line of traffic and broadside add mini van. she celebrated the holiday with the sue family just two days earlier. the only survivor was 10-year- old ellie alley sue she was take on the the hospital with moderate injuries. >> i will take care of her. my daughter and my sister, everybody help each other like that. >> a little girl in the mini van, four-year-old nora elizabeth temple was also killed in the crash. four others in the van were hurt. chp is still looking into what led to this deadly crash. according to this year's thanksgiving data the number of people that died on local roadways is up from last year 44 compared to 32 of last year. however dui arrests are down. elizabeth coo
to come back, coming up in just a few minutes. >>> elizabeth cook is in the part of the bay area that was the wettest today. liz? >> reporter: dana, i'm in marin county where today the area got between one and two inches of rain. we're equating the series of storms to a boxing match. today we took a few hits and ended up okay. but this was just round one. if you had to get in a car today, chances are, your ride looked a lot like this. >> it was pouring down rain. >> reporter: high winds and downed power lines kept pg&e crews busy. in saratoga, this 28-foot section shut down traffic on thelma avenue and knocked out power to 200 homes. same story in pacifica. seven outages this morning left 1200 homes and businesses in the dark for hours. >> we're the first guys to get the winds. it comes right off the ocean. usually it's a little more gusty than what you'd get over the hill or even in san francisco. we're like the front line as far as that's concerned. >> reporter: in san francisco, large pools of water forced public works to shut down a stretch of the great highway. if you were f
and santa clara. >>> elizabeth cook in the part of the bay area that was the wettest today. >> reporter: i'm in marin county where the area got one 1-2 inch was rain. if we're equating this series of storms to a boxing match, today we took a few hits. but this was just the first round. >> reporter: if you had to get in a car today, chances are your ride looked like this. >> pouring down rain. >> reporter: high winds and downed power lines kept pg&e crews busy. in saratoga, this downed section shut down power for 200 homes. same story in pacifica. seven outages this morning left 1,200 homes and businesses in the dark for hours. >> we're the first guys to get the wind, comes right off of the ocean, so it's more gusty than over the mill or even in san francisco -- over the hill or even in san francisco. >> reporter: in san francisco, large pools of water forced public works to shut down a stretch of the great highway. if you were flying out of sfo today, ouch! delays up to three hours! and dozens of arrivals and departures were canceled. in concord people kept their feet to the ground or san
elizabeth cook explains why the initiative suddenly lost momentum. >>> reporter: i'm elizabeth cook in whole foods in san mateo on prop 37. now, a month ago yes on 37 was leading in the polls among likely voters by 60%. today they admit they were outspent by their opponents. the no on 37 campaign spent close to $37 million more than their opponents, mentioned that money was spent on ads on television that had been flooding the airwaves leading up to the election. some of the big name companies including monsanto, dow and pepsi-cola contributing to the no on 37 campaign. the yes on 37 campaign say they are not giving up. they are going to target the fda, food manufacturers and other states. in san mateo, elizabeth cook, cbs 5. >>> locally, richmond residents resoundingly rejected measure. in an initiative to levy taxes on businesses that sell sugar- sweetened drinks. the soda tax was opposed by two- thirds of voters. the measure would have been the first tax in the nation to specifically target more than 700 brands and products containing added sugar. >>> 4:51. coming up, a big day for social
campus drive in berkeley hills tell cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook that the doe is moving slowly and in obvious pain. >> reporter: if you live in many parts of the bay area, you have to learn to live with your neighbors. >> we see them every day. they come usually and eat up all the plants. >> reporter: she noticed something was wrong with the deer in the backyard of her home. >> i felt sick at the thought someone would do that. >> reporter: the doe had an arrow on its side. and next to her, a fawn. young contacted fish and game and sent out these pictures to people who live in the area. >> completely unexpected from berkeley. >> reporter: chris doan came home to see the two deer in his front yard. >> there was no arrow. >> reporter: shooting deer is illegal in berkeley. but chris has his own theory about how the arrow got there. >> one of the neighbors was upset with her eating out of their garden. >> reporter: the department of fish and game say they will continue the search the berkeley hills looking for the doe and her fawn. they are relying heavily on the people who live in
in with elizabeth cook who is in san mateo talking to shoppers about food labelling. >> reporter: well a month ago this -- the ballot initiative was heeding in the polls by 60% but now they admit they were outspent by the opposition and that is what made the difference tonight. the no on 37 campaign raised $37 million more, most of that coming from big name companies like dow and pepsi cola. whole foods was a big supporter of prop 37. most of the customers who were here as well. some found it a little hard to swallow. >> when you have genetically modified food sometimes it's for a good reason, sometimes not so good. but why not say that you're doing it. >> there's plenty of information provided already, as far as i'm concerned. >> reporter: and i spoke to the folks on yes on 37 campaign, they're not giving up. now they plan to target the fda, food manufacturers and other states. this race still not over yet tonight. elizabeth cook, cbs 5. >>> we're also following two very hotly contested votes in san jose. tonight. a david and goliath showdown over raising the minimum wage. it is winning, 57% to 4
to atm. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook is in walnut creek with the surveillance video. liz. >> well, dana, police say it was here at the shade lands business park where that woman was kidnapped. now, police are relying on very revealing surveillance video to help them catch the suspects. >> watch this. two men pull up to an atm. police say they try today withdraw money from the woman's account while she sits in terror in the backseat. police say they went by the names david and aubrey. aubrey takes off his mask to use the atm. he's a white guy in his early 20s, 5-9 and 150 pounds and a slight build wearing a black hoodie and jeans. his cohort david, white, mid 20s, 5-11, 185 pounds, has short dark hair and bronzed shoulders. he's waerg a light-colored t-shirt under a black zip up and jeans. after driving around to two to three different atms, the suspects abandoned the woman and the car in the oakland hills. they troef off in what police think was a get away car. dave carlson comes to the shade lands business park a couple times a week to pick up his kids. >> oh my god, this usually doesn
into action. cbs 5's elizabeth cook tells us about the knife night. >> reporter: ken, it was just a typical night for the 18- and 19-year-old young girls. they were sitting upstairs, watching tv, about 10:30, when all of a sudden an intruder broke into their front door. one woman dialed 911 while the other took him in in what must have felt like an epic battle. the struggle between the freshman and an intruder, armed with a knife, went from the tv room, in the hallway, down the stairs, through the kitchen, out the back door, then through the carport. it went on for several minutes. >> he terrorized these young women. >> reporter: and it ended with the girls stabbing the man multiple times with his own knife, in the face and upper body, bleeding and badly injured. he was able to get away. >> it was just a few minutes. >> reporter: this is a police sketch of the suspect. they say he has serious injuries to his face and torso from the fight and he may have to get emergency treatment. the girl who fought him off was treated for just minor injuries. and her roommate wasn't hurt. allison is a fre
and they found nothing. they're planning to search until they find the missing man. elizabeth cook, cbs 5. >>> you see the rain behind elizabeth. we got this in by a photographer. he stuck a camera on his news van while driving south. wipers going at full speed. it's coming down. cbs 5 meteorologist paul deanno where it's about to really come down. >> the bay bridge is getting the worst of it right now. this front is splitting the bay area in half. in san francisco, oakland, is where we find the heaviest rain right now. concord and pleasant hill you're getting heavy rainfall. areas like santa rosa, you're getting a bit of a break. and the south bay, you're waiting for the first drops of rain. but trust me the morning commute tomorrow around san jose is going to be sloppy. latest computer models suggest a half inch of rainfall for santa rosa with half of that toward hayward and less for san jose. you can look at doppler radar at cbs sf. com. wait until you see how much sunshine in the forecast. coming up next. >> cbs 5 reporter shows us while the thief was casing the house. the house was c
with 53% voting against cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook explains why the initiative suddenly lost momentum. >>> reporter: i'm elizabeth cook in whole foods in san mateo on it. prop 37. now, a month ago yes on 37 was leading in the polls among likely voters by 60%. today they admit they were outspent by their opponents. the no on 37 campaign spent close to $37 million more than their opponents, mentioned that money was spent on ads on television that had been flooding the airwaves leading up to the election. some of the big name companies including monsanto, dow and pepsi-cola contributing to the no on 37 campaign. the yes on 37 campaign say they are not giving up. they are going to target the fda, food manufacturers and other states. in san mateo, elizabeth cook, cbs 5. >>> locally, richmond residents resoundingly rejected measure. n, an initiative to levy taxes on businesses that sell sugar- sweetened drinks. the soda tax was opposed by two- thirds of voters. the measure would have been the first tax in the nation to specifically target more than 700 brands and products containing added
drive. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook has the latest on the search for that wounded animal. >> reporter: if you live in many parts of the bay area you have to learn to live with deer neighbors. is we see them every day. they usually come up and eat up the plants. >> reporter: something was wrong with the deer in the backyard of her berkeley hills home. >> felt sick at the thought that someone would do that. >> reporter: the doe had an arrow in its side and it was crouching on its hind legs. next to her a fawn. these pictures to people who live in the area. >> completely unexpected. >> reporter: chris came home this evening to seep the two deer in his front yard and what may be a good sign. >> there was no arrow. she had what looked like a bloody watch. >> reporter: shooting deer is illegal in berkeley. chris has his own theory. >> one of the neighbors was upset with her eating out of their garden. >> reporter: the defendant fish and game and animal services say they'll continue to search looking for the doe and her fawn. they are relying heavily on the people who live in the area to tra
. elizabeth cook, cbs 5. >>> one last sandy item. this is time lapse video of new york during the storm. you can see how windy it is. and then you can also see the precise moments on the power when it went out in lower manhattan. >>> and the power is still out to thousands of homes and the businesses there. new york's power company will expect much of it to be back on by tomorrow. >>> we're proud to announce that our parent company, they have contributed $1 million to the american red cross. in addition, cbs corporation will match any contribution made by its employees here to nissanty-related relief effort, by making additional contributions to the american red cross. >>> as for the presidential race, the biggest campaign event on the schedule today was the monthly jobs report. nationwide they added 171,000 jobs in october. but with more americans looking for work, the unemployment rate moved up slightly from 7.8 to 7.9%. some more numbers for you. yes, you are looking at nate silver's political calculus blog at the new york times. maybe you check it out every day. maybe we would just turn
energy-efficient lightbulbs may have a dark side. elizabeth cook explains. >> reporter: few of us would expose ourselves to the sun's deadly ultraviolet rays without some protection. but you may already be doing that, inside your home with these. >> when there's something in your house, you don't perceive any danger, so you wouldn't get that close to an x-ray in a doctor's office. >> reporter: a new report found these money saving compact fluorescent lightbulbs emit high levels of ultraviolet radiation. they were randomly tested and the rays are so strong they can actually burn your skin and skin cells. >> the results were that you could actually initiate what we believe is cell death. >> reporter: in other words, exposure to the bulbs could lead to premature aging. what's worse, doctors say, the ultra violate rays can even cause skin cancer. in every testing, they found the protective coating was cracked, allowing dangerous ultraviolet rays to escape. >> everything can cause cancer these days, but... >> reporter: adding to concerns, the federal government is phasing out the old incande
or getting ready to cook thanksgiving dinner you can save money by shopping right now. elizabeth cook on the five things that are cheaper in november. >> reporter: it's amazing what people will do for a good deal. instead of saving your pennies for black friday madness -- >> seems like there's good deals in there. >> reporter: it may be time to warm up your wallet. according to deal news, an online source for all things discounted, this is the perfect time to shop if you're in the market for five very specific items, starting with cook wear. >> it's not a popular christmas gift so these have to be sold during november, otherwise for the holidays it's a no-go. >> reporter: and tools. >> this isn't the time of year most men will buy tools for themselves. that's more spring. >> reporter: if you're in the market for a wedding dress, now is the time to buy. >> the holidays are the top time for engagements but they're the bottom time for weddings. so wedding dresses will be on sale. >> reporter: add to the list candy, turkey, and last but not least, fall clothing. >> retailers have brough
, and in disbelief about who's accused of killing her. officers found her body this morning. elizabeth cook with the manhunt for the suspect. >> reporter: investigatored have confirmed the -- investigators have confirmed the victim. and they are looking for her husband. they have enough evidence to make him a suspect in her murder. >> you sit here every weekend, friday through sunday, teaching my kids. how to be real men, and how to treat women, and everything i've been through, and you've sat their and criticized my decisions. and now i'm standing in front of your house after you did this to your wife. >> reporter: family members arrived at the scene only to realize their worst fears were true. >> patricia was a wonderful woman. very wonderful. and he didn't deserve this. >> reporter: at one time, tanya and her two young boys lived in the home with their aunt and uncle. >> i can see him getting physical. but i can't see this happening. >> reporter: police arrived to discover a woman's body in the entry way with a hoodie around her face. there were no signs of forced entry. >> i can honest
kidnapped a woman, threw her in the back of her car and drove her around from atm to atm. elizabeth cook has the surveillance video. >> reporter: police say it was in this parking lot in the shade lands business park where she was kidnapped. they're relying on revealing surveillance tape to help them catch the suspects. watch this. two men pull up to an atm. police say they try to withdraw money from the woman's account while she sits in the backseat. police say they went by the name david and aubrey. aubrey takes off his mask. he's a white guy in his early 20s20s. wearing a black hoodie and jeans. david has short dark hair and broad shoulders. he's wearing a light colored t- shirt. after driving around to two to three different atm's want suspects abandoned the woman and the car. they drove off in what police think was a get away car. dave karlson comes here a couple times a week. >> i've never heard anything else like that in this area. >> reporter: the woman was able to free herself eventually and make her way to a nearby home where she diamond 911. police won't say how much money was tak
, was clearly irritated. cbs 5's elizabeth cook on the question, the answer, and the bigger picture. >> reporter: well, pelosi said she is staying on because there is still work to do. then the temperature of the room changed all because of a question that inferred it was time for the congresswoman to let the younger folks have a chance. >> reporter: emily post taught us never question or ask a woman about her age. apparently, this reporter didn't read her book. >> you're all over 70, is it time -- >> you're suggesting that everybody step aside? >> i'm simply saying, does it delay younger leadership from moving forward? >> let's for a moment honor it as a legitimate question. [ laughter ] >> although it's quite offensive that you don't realize it, i guess. [ laughter ] >> the fact is that everything that i have done in my almost decade now of leadership is to elect younger and newer people to the congress. >> i think it's offensive because it's often tailored toward women. and there's a lot of male senators. >> reporter: london braid was just elected to the board of supervisors in san francisco.
a whole new market for all things hostess. elizabeth cook is here to explain. >> reporter: lori has a ritual. >> it was almost like the oreo, i would unravel it and eat the chocolate first. >> reporter: for her, ho-hos report just a treat, they're noftinglia -- nostalgia. she was just one of thousands around the country to load up on the creamy goodness. he has been stocking his market in san francisco with twinkies, and cup cakes for years. but they haven't been selling well. >> it's a childhood memory definitely. >> reporter: you can get a couple cakes for a few bucks. but after it went belly-up, folks on craigslist are selling them from up to $2,000 a case. >> i don't know if i should save them, but i think i'll eat them instead. >> we were one of the lucky ones to take home a couple of the more popular treats, the cup cakes and the twinkies. the market was forced to take them off the shelves because they had an expiration date. >>> i don't know when the last time i ate either of those. >> never too late! >> no, it's too late. [ laughter ] >> i know kenny likes them. >> i'll e
their final bite of golden sponge cake. elizabeth cook tells us you won't believe how much they're going for. >> reporter: laurie haggerty has a ritual. >> for me, it was almost like the oreo, where i would unravel it and eat the chocolate first, then eat the cream inside. >> reporter: for her, they aren't just a treat. they're nostalgia. shoppers stripped the shelves at hostess thrift stores, like this one, at the twinkies birth place in chicago. he's been stocking his market in san francisco with twinkies and cupcakes for years but he admits they haven't been selling well lately. >> i'm a twinkies fan. >> reporter: you can get a couple of hostess cakes for a few bucks. but after the news broke that the brand went belly-up, folks on craigslist are selling them for anywhere from $25 to $2,000 a case. >> i don't know if i should save them, but i think i'll eat them instead. >> we were one of the lucky ones to get to take home a couple of the more popular tweets, the cub cakes and of course the twinkies. the market was forced to take them off the store shelves, because ironically, they had an
to be taken in small doses for therapy. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook says now they're known for a crazy and sometimes deadly high. >> reporter: doreen is still haunt bid the phone call. her 15-year-old son alejandro was having convulsions. he went into cardiac arrest and never came out of it. she says two men approached them and offered them some pills. >> he's the only one that took it. i can't comprehend how he would take that pill. >> that pill was aha louisiana genic a, hallucinogenic drug. it causes intense psychedelic drips. smiles is linked to actor johnny lewis who was suspected of killing his landlady or cat before he fell or jumped to his death. users say it's ten times stronger than ecstasy. >> the synthetic compounds are in various groups within the bay area of northern california. you scratch the surface. you get into chat rooms and you can see how big it really is. >> jackie long is a former narcotics officer and works at a rehab facility. these drugs are being sold on the internet and it's not hard to find places to buy them. >> all you need is a credit card. >> earlier
are looking for a man who may have fallen who a quarry off of montgomery street. elizabeth cook is there with who's missing and where searchers are looking tonight. >> well, ken crews areculing this a recovery effort. they had crews in the water, but now they are bringing in the deep water rescue team to try to cover the man. this is the scene from about an hour ago as a helicopter flew in low so they could shine their spotlight on the steep hillside and the water in the quarry below. other crews have been searching the terrain and a couple even propelled down the hillside when they thought they found something. they say the man was outlooking for his cat behind these homes and never came back. and the roommate says he called 911 and they said the crews eventually did find the cat, but not the man. thou right now they are currently dealing with some treacherous terrain. they had to look through the rugged terrain and the rescue team is going to come and look in the water to tie to recover the man and -- to try to recover the man and see what they can find. the water is 40 feet d
'm elizabeth cook. dana and ken are off tonight. >> i'm going to strike to make sure that i'm there. i'm not scared of losing my job. >> reporter: striking against poor working conditions and a culture of intimidation at the big box store. >> they want us to not speak out or if we do, we get disciplined and they retaliate. i feel bad for the people, but no, i'm not going to stop there. >> reporter: workers say that the backlash has already regun as we were there as one wal- mart manager ordered protesters off the property. >> this is private property. again, we're asking you and your group to leave. >> okay, california law gives us the right to talk to customers and handle them in front of the store. >> all right, if you don't leave, we will get the police involved on that. >> reporter: but they have no intention of leaving until wal- mart listens to their pleas for respect and better conditions. more are planned for tomorrow, though protesters worry their numbers could be hurt by workers who are too afraid to strike. to oakland, cbs 5. >>> since opening two weeks ago, it's been a nigh
most wanted on his way back to california after an arrest in mexico. i'm elizabeth cook. >> and i'm allen martin. ewing on the long running . we are getting late word tonight, the actor best known for playing the conniving and mischievous j.r . ewing on the long running series dallas has died. he died late this afternoon from complications of cancer. he was 81. cbs reporter alexis looks back at his career. >> stay out of my affairs pamela. >> you make me sick. >> everybody hates me. they love this character. >> love him or hate him. audiences watched seasons of him playing the infamous j.r . in dallas, j.r . cheated his family, friends and his wife while taking plenty of knocks of his own. when the who shot j.r . episode airs 83 million americans tuned in to watch. in real life heavy drinking led to a liver transplant that prolonged his life and perhaps gave him a sense of mortal hi his tv character j.r . never shared. like j.r . he was born in texas. the son of pack tres mary actress martin. >> we first new him at the astronaut from i dream of jeannie. he received no residuals fo
in their track. >> i'm allen martin. ken bastida has the night off tonight. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook in the bay area city that will likely be the hardest hit. >> reporter: this area, i should say, once all the moisture roles off the pacific and hits the north bay hills they literally act like a wash cloth. for the next few days that wash cloth will be ringing out. this isn't the time to sit back and watch the clouds go by. patricia of san ansalo is loading up on sandbags to keep the water out of her home. >> we live in a low spot at the bottom of a hill. a lot of water comes down. this is to go around the garage and some of the doors and also in the basement. >> david manages an apartment complex in larksbur. >> we made sure all the leave were swept up. and also taking all the furniture down on the decks. >> but it's business as usual at the christmas tree lot at the bonaire shopping center. >> we've had wind storms and rainstorms. and they're lots of fun. people come out rain or shine. >> jaime has been working at the lot every year for the past 33 years. he says he doesn't need to
all fired up. first, cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook is in a part of the bay that will likely be one of the hardest hit. >>reporter: that's right. i'm in one of the areas that paul says will be the hardest hit during the next storm. this is why. once the moisture rolls in, they act like a wash cloth. for the next few days, that wash cloth is going to ring out. >>reporter: this isn't the time to sit back and watch the clouds go by. patricia is loading up on sandbags to keep water out of her home. >> we live in a low spot at the bottom of a hill, so this is this is to go around the doors at the garage. >reporter: david manages an apartment complex. >> we took care of the parking lot, made sure the leaves were swept up and took all the furniture down on the decks. >>reporter: it's business as usual at the christmas tree lot at this shopping center. >> we've had all kind of wind storms and rainstorms. people come out rain or shine. >>reporter: jamie has been working at the lot every year for the past 33 years. he says help doesn't need to do much to prepare for the storm. in fact, he say
, elizabeth cook is getting drenched. >> that's right, allen, the rain has started to pick up in strength over the last couple of minutes. this area is extra vulnerable because it's in a low lying area so all the storm water from the creeks and tributaries flow straight into the river behind me and that flows straight to the middle of f town dmr a soggy thursday evening for people living here. much like the slow moving storm, the rain slowly got stronger as the night went on. with nearly a foot of rain expected in the next several days, these businesses set up sandbags. many had been flooded before. the city is no stranger to massive floods. the worst was back in 1982 causing $28 million in damage. since then they've invested nearly $40 million into the river control project. this man has been in the coast guard for ten years and he says even though the city has a bad past with storms thshgs time they are ready. >> the city has tons of things in place so i think they're well prepared.. >> now, santa rosa city schools sent out after a warning to parents saying they may have to cancel sch
now. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook is in petaluma. >> reporter: hi, dana. the rain has been pretty steady throughout the night. just recently it tapered off a little bit. but as you can see, it's still definitely coming down. this is why this area is so vulnerable. all of the storm water, they all throw straight into the petaluma river, right behind me. and this river runs straight through the center of town. a soggy thursday evening for people who live in petaluma. much like the slow-moving storm, the rain slowly got stronger as the night went on. with nearly a foot of rain expected in the next several days, these businesses set up sandbags. many of them have been flooded before and they weren't taking any chances. the city is no stranger to massive floods. the worst was back in 1982, causing $28 million in damage. since then, they've invested nearly $40 million into the river flood control project, replacing road and railroad bridges, installing flood walls and pump stations. keith has been in the coast guard for ten years and was deployed to the gulf for hurricanes katrina and i
. but there is dna-like technology that can catch a metal thief redhanded. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook shows us how it works and asks, why isn't anyone using it here? >> reporter: thieves crashed a truck through a fence to get to copper wire in this pg&e yard. >> we have had almost $5.2 million in copper theft over the last six years. >> reporter: in vallejo, criminals strip wiring from the electrical grid. >> over the last 18 months, we have had over 97 different locations where thieves have taken the electrical cables that power our streetlights. >> reporter: that's on top of 300 places where they have stolen brass components from the water system. and across the bay area, they take metal from cemeteries. storm drains and automobiles. [ non-english language ] >> reporter: it's a problem that's not foreign to europe, either, where thieves have hit heart at infrastructure like germany's rail s but the germans and others have found the answer to a huge problem may be a tiny dot. >> the at least effective antitheft device ever. >> reporter: an australian based company paints microdots on metal. you d
can save money by shopping right now. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook on the five things that are cheaper in november. >> reporter: it's amazing what people will do for a good deal. instead of saving your pennies for black friday madness -- >> seems like there's good deals in there. >> reporter: it may be time warm up your wallet. according to deal news online stores for all things discounted this is the perfect time to shop if you are in the market for five very specific items starting with cookware. >> it's not a popular christmas gift. so these have to be sold during november. otherwise, for the holidays, it's a no go. >> reporter: and tools. >> this is not the time of year this most men will buy tools for themselves. that tends to be more spring. >> reporter: and from tools to tool. if you are in the market for a wedding dress now is the time to buy. >> the holidays are the top time for engagements but they are the bottom time for wedding so wedding dresses will be on sale. >> reporter: add candy, turkey and last but not least, fall clothing. >> fall merchandise, the
taechls all over the pachlt let's talk with elizabeth cook and talk about proposition 37 that affects everybody who shops for food that's correct. with 24% andthose are leading by -- about a month ago these numbers were split with the yeses having 60% among likely voters, but they were out spent by their voters. the campaign spent close to 47 $47,000 more. that money spenta swarm of ads that flooded the airways on the events leading up to the election. we talked tothe foeks on 24. they're goingto focus their campaign on the usa -- >> thank you very much. allright. let's go now to -- let's see -- chris tinl airs -- who is checking out proposition 32. >> it afierce be lagging in the polls. people have put $74 million into the city campaign >> thank you, chris tin. wewill check back with you. rightnow, we want to go chicago where the president is on the stage with his family. let's take alook. >> [ music playing.] >> >> (kraud is cheer ing crowd is cheering ( >> you can see the energy chicago, can't you, joe >> oh, yeah >> this was a message issue, and the president's message really went
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)